Episode 16: Live with Gary K. Wolfe!

Although we’re having a Federal election here in Australia, and I had to get out and fulfil my democratic obligations, I still found time to jump on to Skype and call Gary to talk about things science-fictional.  We covered reviewing, the end of “books you don’t need to read’, The Wesleyan Anthology of Science Fiction, our awesome technical skills as podcasters, the Coode Street Feminist Advisory Committee (we may need t-shirts), and all sorts of other things in another longish podcast.  We have also accepted we could talk forever – I think we chatted for more than an hour that we didn’t record.  We hope you enjoy it!

Edit: People have had problems with this episode. I’ve republished it on the new host. Hope that solves the problem.

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4 thoughts on “Episode 16: Live with Gary K. Wolfe!”

  1. Okay, guys. “Faded a bit” is not a euphemism for “beaten to death.” And clearly you haven’t beaten “Books you don’t need to read” to death if I’m capable of using the word “need” in the suggested (supplemental!) category of books salvaged from temporary amnesia. (I had to go back and read my own comment, but yes indeed, there it is.) I hope you don’t abandon it altogether. (It’s late here and the worst part of podcasts is that you can’t “look up” anything. Was that “Drive-By Hall of Fame” you came up with for once-venerable stories that don’t wear well? That’s just brilliant.)

    I enjoyed the discussion of how stories wear over time very much indeed. (And while I was listening to you discuss the disappointment the futurians would have felt about 2010, I was looking up Judith Merril’s Shadow on the Hearth on the internet, finding a used copy I fancied the price of, and ordering it. Beats a flying-car traffic jam all hollow, if you ask me. And thank you for mentioning the book, Gary. Just the sort of thing I’d been hoping for.)

  2. Granted that “The Cold Equations” is not up to snuff as a work of art (I’ve always viewed Godwin’s story more as a fable), what can be collected in its place to illustrate the lession that the universe doesn’t care? Perhaps Judith Merril’s “Dead Center”? It was published the same year (1954), it is certainly crafted better, and it even has a innocent sacrificed on the altar of physics.

  3. Is Episode 16 still available? I’ve been able to download all the later ones (I’m working back through the archives) and well as 15 and 14 (so far). Thanks!

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