About

Jonathan-bwJonathan Strahan (born 1964 in Belfast, Northern Ireland) is an editor, podcaster, critic, and occasional publisher. His family moved to Perth, Western Australia in 1968, and he graduated from the University of Western Australia with a Bachelor of Arts in 1986.

In 1990 Jonathan co-founded Eidolon: The Journal of Australian Science Fiction and Fantasy, and worked on it as co-editor and co-publisher until 1999. He was also co-publisher of Eidolon Books which published Robin Pen’s The Secret Life of Rubber-Suit Monsters, Howard Waldrop‘s Going Home Again, Storm Constantine‘s The Thorn Boy, and Terry Dowling‘s Blackwater Days.

In 1997 Jonathan moved to Oakland, California to work for Locus: The Newspaper of the Science Fiction Field as an assistant editor. He wrote a regular review column for the magazine until March 1998 when he returned to Australia. In early 1999 Jonathan resumed reviewing and editorial work for Locus, and was later promoted to Reviews Editor (January 2002 – present). Other reviews have appeared in Eidolon, Eidolon: SF Online, and Foundation. Jonathan has won the Aurealis Award, the Aurealis Convenor’s Award for Excellence, the William Atheling Jr Award for Criticism and Review, the Australian National Science Fiction Convention’s “Ditmar Award“, and the Peter McNamara Achievement Award.

In 1999 Jonathan founded The Coode Street Press (currently inactive), which published the one-shot review ‘zine The Coode Street Review of Science Fiction and co-published Terry Dowling’s Antique Futures.

A ten-time Hugo Award nominee, Jonathan won the World Fantasy Award in 2010 for his work as an editor, and his anthologies have won the Locus Award for Best Anthology three times (2008, 2010, 2013) and the Aurealis Award four times.

As a freelance editor, Jonathan has edited or co-edited more than forty anthologies, and seventeen single-author story collections which have been published in Australia, the United Kingdom, and the United States.

Jonathan currently produces and co-hosts the Coode Street Podcast with Gary K. Wolfe (May 2010-present), which has been nominated for the British Science Fiction Award, the Ditmar Award, and the Hugo Award, and the Coode Street Roundtable with Ian Mond and James Bradley.

Jonathan married former Locus Managing Editor Marianne Jablon in 1999 and they live in Perth, Western Australia with their two daughters, Jessica and Sophie.

Photos

The following photographs were taken by Cat Sparks, and may be used with appropriate acknowledgement. (c) 2016 Cat Sparks.

7 comments

  1. […] One of the many summer activities of Professor Gary Wolfe was podcasting with Locus editor Jonathan Strahan, a three-time Hugo award nominee. Professor Gary K. Wolfe Locus editor Jonathan […]

  2. Scott E. Green says:

    I hope that you plan an anthology project including poetry.

  3. Jonathan says:

    Unfortunately, no. I am no judge of poetry, and have little desire to work on genre poetry. There are, happily, other fine markets out there which would be interested though.

  4. Nick says:

    Hi Jonathon. I live on the mid north coast of NSW. I have been a fan of Jack Vance all my life and would very much like to write to him.

    Could you supply his address? I know it’s Oakland California as I’ve just read his autobiography.

  5. […] The Best Science Fiction and Fantasy of the Year: Volume Six from Jonathan Strahan […]

  6. […] Jonathan Strahan and Gary K. Wolfe, for example, discussed the review at length in their excellent (and highly recommended) The Coode Street Podcast, and then had Paul as a guest the next week. And just recently, two of the UK’s outstanding hard SF writers – Paul McAuley and Alastair Reynolds – have also offered their takes on the matter. Here’s Alastair Reynolds’ response to the question; and here’s Paul McAuley’s. Both posts are worth reading – as, indeed, are the authors’ novels. […]

  7. […] Jonathan Strahan and Gary K. Wolfe, for example, discussed the review at length in their excellent (and highly recommended) The Coode Street Podcast, and then had Paul as a guest the next week. And just recently, two of the UK’s outstanding hard SF writers – Paul McAuley and Alastair Reynolds – have also offered their takes on the matter. Here’s Alastair Reynolds’ response to the question; and here’s Paul McAuley’s. Both posts are worth reading – as, indeed, are the authors’ novels. […]

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