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Category: Science fiction

Working for Tor.com

Working for Tor.com

As I’ve mentioned here before, I started editing fiction for Tor.com last year. It’s been a real pleasure, and I’m looking forward to acquiring many more stories in the coming years.

At the moment three of my stories are out there in the world:

Coming up are some terrific new stories by Kij Johnson, Walter Jon Williams, Lavie Tidhar and others.

Dimension 6 – Issue 7

Dimension 6 – Issue 7

Dimension 6 The latest issue of Keith Stevenson’s Dimension 6 is out tomorrow (April 1). The first issue for 2016 features three new stories:

  • ‘In the Slip’ by Emillie Colyer
  • ‘Guitarrista’s Lament’ by Jeff Suwak
  • ‘Preservation of Faith’ by Dustin Adams

If you’re reading science fiction and fantasy  and are interested in what’s happening in Australia, it’s well worth checking out.

ToC – Drowned Worlds

ToC – Drowned Worlds

drownedworldsI have just put the last touches to Drowned Worlds: Tales from the Anthropocene and Beyond which is due from Solaris in July.  With a spectacular cover from Les Edwards, and a bunch of great stories, I think it’s all come together really well. I’m hoping you’ll like it too.

Here’s the table of contents:

  • Elves of Antarctica, Paul McAuley
  • Dispatches from the Cradle: The Hermit – Forty-Eight Hours in the Sea of Massachusetts, Ken Liu
  • Venice Drowned, Kim Stanley Robinson
  • Brownsville Station, Christopher Rowe
  • Who Do You Love?, Kathleen Ann Goonan
  • Because Change Was the Ocean and We Lived by Her Mercy, Charlie Jane Anders
  • The Common Tongue, the Present Tense, the Known, Nina Allan
  • What is, Jeffrey Ford
  • Destroyed by the Waters, Rachel Swirsky
  • The New Venusians, Sean Williams
  • Inselberg, Nalo Hopkinson
  • Only Ten More Shopping Days Left Till Ragnarök, James Morrow
  • Last Gods, Sam J. Miller
  • Drowned, Lavie Tidhar
  • The Future is Blue, Catherynne M. Valente

I think it’s sharp, pointed, timely and sometimes satirical. I think it’s about who we are when faced with disaster, and not about disaster. I think it makes for good reading.  Here’s what the publisher says about it:

Last call for the Gone World…

We live in a time of change. The Anthropocene Age – the time when human-induced climate change radically reshapes the world – is upon us. Sea water is flooding the streets of Florida, island nations are rapidly disappearing beneath the waves, the polar icecaps are a fraction of what they once were, and distant, exotic places like Australia are slowly baking in the sun.

Drowned Worlds asks fifteen of the top science fiction and fantasy writers working today to look to the future, to ask how will we survive? Do we face a period of dramatic transition and then a new technology-influenced golden age, or a long, slow decline? Swim the drowned streets of Boston, see Venice disappear beneath the waves, meet a woman who’s turned herself into a reef, traverse the floating garbage cities of the Pacific, search for the elf stones of Antarctica, or spend time in the new, dark Dust Bowl of the American mid-west. See the future for what it is: challenging, exciting, filled with adventure, and more than a little disturbing.

Whether here on Earth or elsewhere in our universe, Drowned Worlds give us a glimpse of a new future, one filled with romance and adventure, all while the oceans rise…

I think this is a good book. I hope you’ll consider reading it.

Coode St Roundtable 4 – April 2016

Coode St Roundtable 4 – April 2016

intoeverywhere.jpg

The book selection for the April episode of the Coode St Roundtable has been made! Next month our intrepid readers will come together to discuss the new novel from Paul McAuley, Into Everywhere.   

The publisher describes the novel like this:

The Jackaroo, those enigmatic aliens who claim to have come to help, gave humanity access to worlds littered with ruins and scraps of technology left by long-dead client races. But although people have found new uses for alien technology, that technology may have found its own uses for people. The dissolute scion of a powerful merchant family, and a woman living in seclusion with only her dog and her demons for company, have become infected by a copies of a powerful chunk of alien code. Driven to discover what it wants from them, they become caught up in a conflict between a policeman allied to the Jackaroo and the laminated brain of a scientific wizard, and a mystery that spans light years and centuries. Humanity is about to discover why the Jackaroo came to help us, and how that help is shaping the end of human history.

The Roundtable always features spoilers, so if you’re planning on reading along with this, grab a copy of Paul’s new novel and get ready for the last weekend in April!

Happy anniversary, baby?

Happy anniversary, baby?

Huh. Well, that’s a curious thought. LinkedIn tells me that Coode Street Productions started up in March 1997, which would mean that it would be twenty years old next year.
 
The date, of course, isn’t technically correct. I must have added it to cover my anthology editing career. That would have started around then. Jeremy Byrne and I pitched The Year’s Best Australian Science Fiction and Fantasy to Louise Thurtell at HarperCollins Australia around then. Jeremy might have more precise dates.
 
The Coode St name wasn’t in play then, though. That came a little later. Probably in mid-1999. I was living in a place on Coode St in Mt Lawley then and decided to produce a review magazine with Steven Paulsen for the 1999 WorldCon in Melbourne. We only produced a single issue, but that was the birth of Coode Street Publications (probably in June 1999).
 
While the Coode St anniversary is incorrect, the anthology anniversary is not. I feel like I should do something to commemorate the 20 years of anthology editing come next March, but I’m not quite sure how.