Episode 299: Liza Groen Trombi and the Locus Year in Review

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For our 299th episode, we are joined once again by Locus editor-in-chief Liza Groen Trombi for our annual discussion of the Locus Magazine recommended reading list, covering the history of how the list evolved, who participates in compiling it, what its purpose is, and what our own thoughts are about the titles included this year in the book categories of the list(included the newly reinstated Horror Novel category). We also pay a brief tribute to our old friend and former Locus columnist Ed Bryant, who passed away earlier this week.

Links for this episode:

Our thanks for Liza for making the time to join us. As always we hope you enjoy the episode. See you next week!

 

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Episode 298: Lisa Yaszek, Kathleen Ann Goonan and Sisters of Tomorrow

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This week we are joined in our luxurious Coode Street studio by Lisa Yaszek, co-editor (with Patrick B. Sharp) of Sisters of Tomorrow: The First Women of Science Fiction, and our old friend Kathleen Ann Goonan, whose essay “Challenging the Narrative, Or, Women Take Back Science Fiction” serves as a provocative afterword to the anthology.

We discuss how and why women were largely written out of early histories of science fiction, their contributions as writers, editors, journalists, poets, and artists during the pulp era, and how the situation has evolved from the pulp era to the present, and how American women SF writers might be represented in Lisa’s forthcoming Library of America anthology.

As always, our thanks to our guests for making the time to join us. And see you next week!

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Episode 297: Politics and science fiction

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This week we return to the Gershwin Room to discuss what we’ve been reading lately, what we’re anticipating, what do you when you encounter a story by an idol or a good friend which isn’t quite up to standard, and what the state of political science fiction is, with both Orwell’s 1984 and Sinclair Lewis’s It Can’t Happen Here returning to the U.S. bestseller lists for the first time in decades. We also discuss political action within the science fiction field towards the end of the podcast, and touch on Norman Spinrad’s new novel.

As always, we hope you enjoy the episode.

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Episode 296: A Return to Normal Programming

It’s a brand new day. A dark, scary depressing day, maybe, but a brand new one. With the 45th president of the United States of America sworn in, Gary and Jonathan turned their attention to more typical things in the first rambling chat of the year.

This week they start by chatting about recent trends in science fiction, most notably science fiction influenced by man-made climate change like Kim Stanley Robinson’s New York 2140 and Cat Sparks’ Lotus Blue, before talking at length about the upcoming World Science Fiction Convention in Helsinki, nominating for the Hugo awards (with some nomination suggestions), and finishing up talking about the recently released ballot for the Philip K. Dick Award.

As always, we hope you enjoy the podcast. And if you do, please consider mentioning it to a friend!

 

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2017 Philip K. Dick Award Nominees Announced

It’s awards season and the judges of the 2017 Philip K. Dick Award and the Philadelphia SF Society, along with the Philip K. Dick Trust, have released the first major ballot of the year. The nominated works for the 2017 Philip K. Dick Award for ‘distinguished science fiction published in paperback original form in the United States during the previous calendar year’ are:

First prize and any special citations will be announced on Friday, April 14, 2017 at Norwescon 40 at the DoubleTree by Hilton Seattle Airport, SeaTac, Washington.

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